Reactor Sample Library

This page contains many sample configuration files that can be loaded into the Reactor series relay controllers.  Here we will describe each sample individually.  All samples are contained within a single download that will be updated periodically.

Compatibility:

The Reactor control CPU is identical among all Reactor series controllers.  However, best results are achieved when a Reactor sample is loaded into a controller with the appropriate number of relays.  In the list below, you will see a "Relays" column.  This column indicates the number of relays required for the sample to function as described.  If you see a "1" in this column, this indicates compatibility will nearly all Reactor series controllers.  A "2" in the "Relays" column means you need at least 2 relays for the sample to function properly (though you may see limited functionality when using the sample with a controller equipped with only 1 relay.

KeyFob Compatibility:

If you are using a Reactor controller equipped with a KeyFob interface chip, then the KeyFob samples should be loaded, as they focus on Reactor controllers equipped with a KeyFob interface.  However, if you see another sample you would like to run with a KeyFob interface, then here is a little trick to help you adapt the sample:  The "Input Configuration" tab of the NCD Configuration Utility contains all parameter changes needed to convert any sample to a KeyFob sample.  The KeyFob interface controller chip interfaces to the Analog inputs of a standard Reactor controller.  A KeyFob Reactor is exactly like a standard Reactor controller, except the analog inputs have been connected to the KeyFob interface chip.  In some cases, you can have a KeyFob interface AND analog inputs on the same controller.  Regardless, if you want to adapt a standard Reactor sample to operate from a KeyFob, the only required changes will be on the "Input Configuration" tab of the NCD Configuration Utility.  Simply adapt the input section to match the conditions of your KeyFob remote control.  KeyFobs work slightly different, analog inputs are usually low and only go high when the button is held down on the KeyFob remote control.  So make sure you adapt the samples for the differences in inputs.  Also, you should note that analog inputs connected to a KeyFob interface chip NEVER reach the full 255 scale on the Input Configuration screen.  The Reactor CPU runs at 5VDC while the KeyFob interface CPU operates at 3.3VDC.  For this reason, the maximum voltage on the 0-5V analog inputs is 3.3V (so the absolute maximum possible analog input value will be around 169, but you should take actual value measurements to be sure).

Reactor Sample Library

Sample: Relays: Up/Down Jumper: Description:
Sample 1-1.NCD 1 UP This sample demonstrates how 8 Analog Inputs can be used to toggle a single relay, this sample is a better choice for push button applications.  If you plan to use a switch instead of a push button, please see Sample 1-11. This sample applies to applications whereby 8 light switches control a single light.
Sample 1-2.NCD 1 UP This sample demonstrates how a contact closure is required to keep a relay from turning on.  A practical application for this is an alarm system that is activated if a wire is cut or broken.
Sample 1-3.NCD 1 UP This sample demonstrates how a contact closure can directly control a relay.  In this example, the relay only comes on when input 1 is connected to ground.
Sample 1-4.NCD 1 UP This sample demonstrates the use of a single timer.  When input 1 is connected to ground, relay 1 is activated for 10 seconds.  If input 2 is connected to ground, the timer is canceled and the relay turns off.  This sample can be adapted for use in activating a light when motion is detected with provisions for a manual override.
Sample 1-5.NCD 1 UP This sample demonstrates the use of a Rotation to flash a relay.  Analog input 1 is used to Activate the flash operation while analog input 2 is used to cancel the flash operation.  The flash rate can be controlled by redefining the length of a second on the "Reactor Event Configuration" tab.  Decrease the "Define Length of a Second" value to flash the relay faster.  Increase this value to slow down the flash rate.
Sample 1-6.NCD 1 UP This sample demonstrates the use of a Autorotation to momentarily trigger a relay when analog input 1 is connected to ground.  The relay flashes only 1 time when analog input 1 is grounded. 
Sample 1-7.NCD 1 UP This sample demonstrates the use of 2 event-piped timers.  When analog input 1 is connected to ground, Timer 1 is activated and the relay turns on for 10 seconds.  When this timer expires, it triggers Timer 2 for 2 seconds.  When timer 2 expires, Timer 1 is activated for 10 seconds.  The end result is relay 1 turns on for 10 seconds then goes off for 2 seconds, then back on for 10 seconds in a repeating cycle.  The cycle is started when Analog Input 1 is connected to ground.  If Analog input 2 is connected to ground, the cycle is canceled. 
Sample 1-8.NCD 1 UP This sample is exactly like Sample 1-7, except Relay 1 is associated with Timer 2.  When analog input 1 is grounded, a timing cycle begins.  Timer 1 activates for 10 seconds.  At the end of the 10 second timer, Timer 2 activates for 2 seconds.  When timer 2 activates, Relay 1 turns on.  When timer 2 expires, Timer 1 is triggered again and Relay 1 turns off for 10 seconds.  The cycle is started when analog input 1 is grounded.  The cycle is canceled when analog input 2 is grounded.  End result is a 10 second relay off and a 2 second relay on repeating cycle.
Sample 1-9.NCD 1 UP This sample demonstrates how a single contact closure input can trigger 4 relay output pulses on Relay 1.  When analog input 1 is connected to ground, Relay 1 will pulse 4 times in a row.  If you are using this controller with 2 or more relays, relay 2 will activate as a side effect to this configuration.
Sample 1-10.NCD 1 UP This sample demonstrates how a single contact closure input can trigger a two relay pulses using a single Autorotation.  When analog input 1 is connected to ground, the relay will pulse two times in a row.  This configuration reduces the length of a second.
Sample 1-11.NCD 1 UP This sample is very similar to Sample 1-1, but is a better choice for switches rather than push buttons, as it is very sensitive to any changes on the analog inputs.
Sample 1-12.NCD 1 UP This sample demonstrates a simple thermostat.  This thermostat works with controllers that have an integrated temperature sensor, but may be easily adapted to use external sensors.  This sample requires a sensor connection to analog inputs 7 and 8.  Analog input 8 is used to turn on a heater if the temperature falls too low.  Once the heater is activated, the heater stays on until the temperature climbs.  Analog input 7 is used to cancel the timer cycle if the temperature exceeds the preset limit.

Reactor Samples